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AIC Grower Export Registration for 2016-17 Season

- 27 Jun '16

All growers intending to export avocados in the current season must be registered with Avocado Industry Council (AIC) as set out in the industry Export Marketing Strategy (EMS). 
 
You can complete this registration online at the NZ Avocado website. Please see instructions below. 
 
Grower export registrations completed and paid by 15 August are $150 GST. Registrations made after this date will be $300 GST.
 

If you are unable to register for export online then please contact the NZ Avocado office if you need to register manually and we will arrange a paper registration form for you. Please be aware that a $30 GST administration fee will be added to your export registration fee for a manual registration.

  1. In your internet browser window, type www.nzavocado.co.nz/industry into the website address bar and press ENTER on your key board.

  2. Login using the "Industry Member Sign-In your username will be in the format of firstname.lastname and your password will be what your currently use to sign on to the industry website. Once signed in, click the Spray Diary and Industry Tools link at the top right of the screen.

  3. You will now be in the Industry Tools section of the New Zealand avocado website. In the list of login types, click Grower AvoTools.

  4. Select your 5-digit PPIN (e.g. P12345) that you wish to register for export. Click Open.

  5. Click the Grower Export Registration link.

  6. AvoGreen compliance - You must be AvoGreen compliant to be eligible to register for export.  You will be asked to verify this compliance (either you are an owner-operator or your orchard is monitored by an operator or by another owner-operator).

    Click the two tick boxes at the bottom of the screen to verify your compliance then click Proceed to next step.

    If you are not compliant, a message will show on screen asking you to contact us for assistance.  
     
  7. Terms & conditions before registering you need to agree to abide by the Terms and Conditions, and to comply with the EMS and the Grower Responsibilities section of the AIC Quality Manual. The EMS and Terms and Conditions are available to view in this screen.

    Click on the tick box at the bottom of the screen to accept then click Proceed to next step.

  8. Your details - check that the details held on file for you or your company are correct and amend any incorrect details. Please ensure that your email address is up-to-date as it will be used to send your registration confirmation, yield estimate and intended packer choices.
      
  9. Yield estimate This section has automatically populated your yields from the previous season.  You must type in your crop estimate for export and local market for the current season, if you are unsure please check your packer agreement or talk to your packer. 

  10. Orchard hectares This section has automatically populated your orchard hectares, please check this information and amend if it is incorrect.  If you are a new grower, please add this information - there are calculation instructions on the right hand side of the screen. 

  11. Intended packer choices - select your intended packer. If you select a packer, your registration will automatically be emailed to that packer once your registration is completed.

    If you do not select a packer during registration then it is your responsibility to provide your later chosen packer(s) with a copy of your registration. 

  12. Payment choose your payment method (credit card, direct credit or cheque). Your registration will not be confirmed and verified until AIC receives your payment in full.

    Please note: If paying by direct credit please use your PPIN number as the reference. A credit card transaction will incur an additional 2.8% transaction fee.

    If paying by cheque, please include your PPIN number on the back and post it to: Avocado Industry Council, PO Box 13267, Tauranga, 3141

  13. Confirmation- Once details are checked and the payment has been received then you will be sent a confirmation email with an attached copy of your registration form (which acts as a tax receipt).

    If you have any issues online registration, please call 0800 AVOCADO for assistance.

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